Science

science

Science

The Council of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) approved the name dubnium for the element of atomic number 105, the name flerovium for the element 114 in honor of the Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions of JINR and the founder of FLNR Academician G.N. Flerov, the name moscovium for the ele­ment 115 in honor of the Moscow region and the ancient Russian land that is the home of JINR, and the name oganesson for the ele­ment 118 in honor of Academician Yuri Oganessian (FLNR JINR) for his pioneering contributions to transactinoid elements research. That demonstrates the international recognition of the achievements of JINR’s staff of researchers and their contribution to modern physics and chemistry.

The Joint Institute for Nuclear Research is an international intergovernmental organization, a world famous scientific centre that is a unique example of integration of fundamental theoretical and experimental research with development and application of the cutting edge technology and university education. The rating of JINR in the world scientific community is very high.

The Institute possesses a mighty basis: traditions of scientific schools acknowledged worldwide; basic facilities with unique capacity to solve challenging tasks in various fields of modern physics; the status of an international intergovernmental organization.

The basic element of the triad – fundamental science – includes the so-called framework projects, namely the projects that imply the use of large experimental facilities. New scientific trends appear and new technologies are developed through their accomplishment. The unique powerful fleet of basic facilities of JINR (accelertors and reactors) has been a strong attraction for decades for scientists from Member States and many other centres of the world.

The research policy of JINR is determined by the Scientific Council, which consists of eminent scientists from the Member States as well as famous researchers from China, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, India, Italy, Switzerland, the USA, the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and others

The Joint Institute possesses a remarkable choice of experimental facilities for physics: the only in Europe and Asia superconducting accelerator of nuclei and heavy ions – the Nuclotron, heavy ion cyclotrons U-400 and U-400M with record beam parameters for experiments on the synthesis of heavy and exotic ions, a unique neutron pulsed reactor IBR-2 used for research in neutron nuclear physics and condensed matter physics, and a proton accelerator – the Phasotron that is used for ray therapy.

Wide inter­national coope­ration is the major factor in JINR acti­vities. The Insti­tute collabo­rates with more than 800 scien­tific cent­res and univer­sities in 64 count­ries of the world.

The unique powerful fleet of basic facilities of JINR (accelertors and reactors) has been a strong attraction for decades for scientists from Member States and many other centres of the world. In the frames of applied research projects are implemented aimed at the development of scientific base of JINR Member States, construction of new facilities and elaboration of scientific programmes for them. Projects to develop cyclotrons in Kazakhstan, Slovakia have been acomplished for the recent years.

Parallel with “home” activities, JINR continues its participation in large international projects (LHC, FAIR, XFEL), research programmes at the accelerators RHIC and Tevatron (USA) and is included into the participation in projects to develop the International Linear Collider (ILC).

The Joint Institute actively cooperates with the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in theoretical and experimental research in high energy physics. Today, JINR physicists take part in 20 projects of CERN.

The considerable contribution of JINR into the implementation of the challenging project of the 21 century – the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) – has been highly estimated by the world scientific community. All JINR responsibilities in the design and development of systems for the detectors ATLAS, CMS, ALICE and the LHC collider itself have been successfully and fully accomplished.

The Central Information Computing Complex (CICC) of the Institute actively participates in tackling the tasks related to the LHC experiments and other scientific projects with large-scale calculations.

40 discoveries in nuclear physics were made in JINR. The programme of studies of superheavy elements deserves special mentioning. Dubna scientists have synthesized new, long-lived superheavy elements with the atomic numbers 113, 114, 115, 116, 117 and 118. The decision of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) approved the name dubnium for the element of atomic number 105, the name flerovium for the element 114 in honor of the Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions of JINR and the founder of FLNR Academician G.N. Flerov, the name moscovium for the ele­ment 115 in honor of the Moscow region and the ancient Russian land that is the home of JINR, and the name oganesson for the ele­ment 118 in honor of Academician Yuri Oganessian (FLNR JINR) for his pioneering contributions to transactinoid elements research demonstrates the international recognition of the achievements of JINR’s staff of researchers and their contribution to modern physics and chemistry. These challenging discoveries crowned 35 years of efforts taken by scientists from different countries in the search for the “stability island” of superheavy nuclei.

Each year the Insti­tute assigns more than 1500 scien­tific papers and reports writ­ten by about 3000 authors to the edito­rial offices of many jour­nals and organizing commit­tees. JINR publica­tions are distri­buted in more than 50 count­ries in the world.